EU Votes Down Porn Ban

| March 18, 2013 | 0 Comments

EU Voted To Strike Down Porn Ban Legislation

European citizens are able to relax again, after the European Parliament voted to reject plans to prohibit “all varieties of pornography” in the EU’s territory.
The ” porn ban ” was part of a report geared toward stamping out gender stereotypes in the EU territory. This week, 625 members of the European Parliament voted 368-159 to pass the report, but without the questionable blockade of pornography (with 98 abstaining).
Porn Ban

EU Votes On Porn Ban

This vote forms the majority viewpoint of Europe’s voting political figures (from which the European Commission would be able to structure new laws). This kind of legislation would usually be voted upon once again and turned into binding legislation in the 27 participating state blocs of the EU.
Since the viewpoint of the Parliament has at present time been strongly crafted, it becomes extremely difficult for the Commission to draft other porn-blocking laws for an additional future vote in Parliament.
The porn-blocking recommendations were at first presented by Dutch Member of the European Parliament (MEP) for the Socialist Party Kartika Tamara Liotard. They were concealed within a comprehensive study called “Eliminating gender stereotypes in the EU,” which was submitted to Parliament in early December.
The report certainly had positive goals. It attempted to narrow the gender inequality discrepancy in the EU territory by raising awareness and cultivating ways to reduce gender stereotypes in educational institutions and workplaces as well as the media.
Nevertheless, it instantly caused disputes.
The brief incorporated such varied and ill-defined procedures like asking the European Union to reaffirm their stance on a previous decision for a “ban on virtually all types of pornography in the media,” in addition to providing various online companies “policing rights” over content posted on their networks.
Amendments to the document eliminated certain explanatory parts. That said, they did not remove the reference to the aforementioned resolution that asked for a complete prohibition on pornography in the area in 1997, which was approved by the Parliament.
Even though the reasoning was taken out, the impact was not, according to Rick Falkvinge, Swedish MEP for the Pirate Party.
He stated that a “split vote” was called on to eliminate the statement — “which called for a ban on all forms of pornography in the media” — and yet despite this, the 1997 decision continues to be referenced. Thereby the call to prohibit “all forms of pornography in the media” continues to be unchanged.
Falkvinge asserted that removing this text “has no other effect than deliberately obscuring the purpose of the new report.”
Yet to make matters worse, once a few MEPs asked their citizens to email their legislators and complain, the parliament’s own IT division started to prevent such emails from reaching the politicians’ inboxes.
Pirate Party member Christian Engström (who initially broke the news), stated that the move was an “absolute disgrace.” He declared that he was going to issue a formal complaint to the Parliament’s president with regards to this “totally undemocratic practice.”
Not long before this, Parliament was found to be using similar tactics after a resident outcry over the anti-piracy trade deal, ACTA (the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement). ACTA Citizens had noticed then too that their emails were getting lost in the network’s junk email filters.

ACTA fell apart after an overall negative vote by the Parliament which indicated a dismissal of the transatlantic deal.

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Jordan Blum is a lifelong nudie and co-founder of Young Naturists America.