Are You A Young Nudist Too?

| May 1, 2012 | 11 Comments

Young Nudist and Wondering What To Do?

Young nudist – When I was growing up there was a popular song entitled, “I Wanna be Rich.”  It seemed like a good idea at the time, so I planned to grow up and be rich.  Little did I realize that being a social worker isn’t going to make me rich.

So, I’m not rich.  I get by and I’m not starving, but the contents of my bank account doesn’t put me on the Forbes 400 List.  Looking at the list, it seems that everyone I know is with me in not being on the list, so I guess I’m in good company.  Many of my not-rich friends enjoy going to nudist locations, including naturist camps, nudist resorts, and naked parties, which sometimes presents a problem: these places and events all cost money.  Not being rich, that’s sometimes quite a hardship for us.

Young Nudist

Young And Nudist

As young people, many of us are not only not rich, we’re in quite the opposite of rich: poor.  It is often the young people who are in college full-time, which means they’re not working full-time and earning a big paycheck.  After college, we finally get a full paycheck but we also get the joy of paying back our student loans, which take up much of that paycheck.  Those who are young and living in their first home of their own are fraught with the extra costs of not just paying for their home but also furnishing their home and buying every single thing that a home needs, from towels and pots & pans to paint and decorations. This is very expensive, especially for young people who are newer to the workforce and not making huge salaries just yet.

So how do we build a bridge for these young people who have little money and huge expenses but have a desire to participate in the nudist community?  We can start by being thankful that these young people don’t need to expend money for new clothes for the event, I suppose.  But beyond that, what can we do?  I’ve heard a proposal that young people should have a substantially lower fee for daily rates and memberships at clubs.  I know that all young people would agree. But would all of the business owners?  As someone who helps in the operation of my local nudist club, I can see the other side of this coin: if people don’t pay for admission or membership, there won’t be enough income to keep the place open.   It’s a quandary for me since I really can see both sides of the debate.

Dear readers, I’m wondering what YOU think!  Should young people get a discount?  If so, how much and what should the age cut-off be?  How could/ should this be proposed to clubs so that they understand that it’s to their benefit to create a young adult price?  Inquiring minds want to know: I want to know.

Nudist Blogs By Melissa Of Young Naturists & Young Nudists America

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Category: Guest Nudist Blogs, Nudism and Naturism, Nudist Organizations and The Naturist Movement, Social Nudity

About the Author ()

36 year old nudist from Catskill, NY. Love life, hiking, climbing trees, writing, and helping people. Been a nudist since the age of 28 and found it to be a life changing way of living.
11 comments
zandar
zandar

This very relevant topic sits astride the two polemics of naturist ideology; the material versus the non-material. So you want to espouse of the non-material and make a detour from the catwalk culture? Then you've  actually not only labelled yourself as a nudist character, but also as a non-fashion icon. Economically speaking, nudists and naturists are worth less to the economics of society, to the corporate-imaged culture, than their counterparts that compete for fashion pips. There's  even the important spin factor, that the corporate-imaged economy subsidizes their pawns; they'd  promote and raise salaries of those they recognized to be real label mavens, the collectors of fashion-label-clothing.   So as naturists, you are facing some real handicaps economically, despite the clever comments about saving soap and laundry detergent. And to get back to square zero, they are between the two sides of the proverbial coin, the material and the non-material. Only the ultra-rich of society have the privelege of having their cake to eat, too; they fabricate a secret character of their nudist or possibly even kinkiness and keep that as separate from their socialimage. The not-so-wealthy usually don't  have the doh to afford a secretive lifestyle. They have no  'private beaches',  nude yacht cruises or other of their upper-crust diversions. And with that preface, future considerations should be clearer.  There does actually exist a narrow-bandwidth of nudist economics. But documentation and keeping facts straight are required as the sources often are transient and vary from year to year   Say for example, a nudists needs some money to go to the NudeCon?  Well, they should go right for the jugular vein, maybe they could get some $ from them, from the NudeCon group. Don't  borrow from Peter to pay Paul, go right at them. That's  a major strategy to surviving as a naturist.  Then, there are NUMEROUS sub-cults that are nudist-endorsing; life modelling, pin-up modelling, using certain experimental products for various medical laboratories, health products,  being employed at a nudist colony, accupuncture lectures,. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .   Then there are tricks to get past the elaborate fashionista culture;. . sort of a way to be 'Anti-Fashion.'  Begin with removing any trace of a label from your clothing, keeping 'your threads'  on the generic level also facilitates thinking as a naturist that possibly could be wearing some garbs or other. And precludes you chanting some advertising slogan at a random instant. So would making clothes for yourself, beginning with some simple garment to get the feel of the thread on your skin, and not some weird device.   Being certain to get the schedules of rates straight does improve the conditions of a frugal nudist lifestyle, but there's no real social equality there. So talking about nice ideals of 'Body Equality' gets to be too vapid. There are aspects of nudist economics that have a high enough profit margin to let you keep your lifestyle while you transition to the alternative. But you really have to be ever mindful of the fact that you are worthless to the corporate fashionista economy.    

nordicshores
nordicshores

I live in central New Jersey, so I can only speak with regard to what's available in my area. Gunnison Beach on Sandy Hook is free if you get there before 7AM, otherwise $15 for the day (NOTE: the $15 charge is *per car*, not per person - entrance per person is free, so if you can carpool you can split the $15 cost). Rock Lodge Resort has a daily rate of $15 for students or $25 for non-students. The annual rate for Rock Lodge is $113 regardless of age or status. I'm a little suprised that Rock Lodge offers a discount on the daily rate to students but not on the annual. But you have to keep in mind that most clubs are privately owned, so they decide for themselves what is financially feasible to charge. Just because it would be good for nudism as a whole for them to offer discounts doesn't mean they will. The other cost that needs to be factored in is transportation. Gunnison is accessible only by car or by ferry from NYC. Not everyone has a car, and the ferry isn't cheap either. And Rocky Lodge isn't necessarily on the beaten path either. So the question is - what does a nudist or aspiring nudist on a budget do to practice the lifestyle? I have to say that one of my biggest frustrations is the lack of good social media options for nudists (which Dejanude vlogged about recently I think). There are a number of nudists sites out there, some better than others but none that are great. The key for nudists is networking, networking, networking. It doesn't cost anything to have a meetup at someone's house or apartment. And, in the case of Gunnison Beach, for example, going with multiple people helps split the cost. I would also recommend that everyone join AANR. It's the premier organization representing nudists, and I think they can use all the young nudist help they can get. The annual rate is $25 for students, $58 otherwise. Not too bad.

Kevin
Kevin

For someone who is 22 and fresh out of college. YES. Young people who have never really experienced nudist or naturist culture or communities aren't sure if they really want a membership or pay a lot of money to find out what its like when they can barely get by with their money going to rent, gas, food, etc. There's also the stigma that has yet to be broken that people who do this are old, unattractive, overweight, etc. If we truly want the largest diversity of people, there needs to be good incentives for the people who are on the fence to give it a try. Short term it might hurt especially for small resorts, but in the long term it really helps to have a larger and more diverse group of fellow nudists, like myself.

Andrew
Andrew

My wife and I are in our 30's, self employed, and though we live quite comfortably (by our own standards), we technically hover right around the poverty line. We have never been to a nudist campground for the sole reason that we cannot afford it. We would love to go, but when a conventional site costs around $20-30 per night, there's no comparison. Every time we go on a trip, I check nudist sites in the area, and am totally blown away by the price, and the fact that you are charged 3 times (camping rate, day fee, membership fee) just for the "privilege" of taking your clothes off. For us, we just have to content ourselves with being naked in our tent - no charge.

Mike Taylor
Mike Taylor

Rate cuts are not an answer. These young people will fidn the money if they want somthing enough. They'll spend almost as much to go to a movie, more to buy a new video game. How about a free day pass one day a month for anyone with a valid student ID. The Idea is to get the younger set interested and as most know ounce you have tried nude outdoors you want to do it again. You could almost count on a certian persentage of return visitors and new members.

Felicity Jones
Felicity Jones

I like the "bring a friend" idea just for young people. & Andy, yes that's the thing, they will choose other cheaper things to do. Rob, yes it's a crappy economy, but it's much harder for young people who likely don't have an established position, job, career or residence yet, hefty student loans and haven't built up savings. I don't think Solair has young adult/student rates anymore. Of course it's up to the individual resort, but for those that would like to attract younger clientele, I think lower rates will help. If smaller resorts aren't getting many young people to begin with I don't think it will hurt their business to create young-adult rates.

Billy V
Billy V

Some camps do this, such as Sunny Rest and Solair. But both these resorts are large places with many visitors each weekend so they can afford to do this. Some smaller resorts can't afford to give discounts like this. It should be up to the individual facility whether they institute young adult discounts.

Rob
Rob

With the economy many more people are just as hard off as young people. I don't think giving them a break if your not willing to give everybody a break is fair at all. Maybe some basic fees can be reduced for everybody in hopes of bringing in more people but then charging for other options.

Jared
Jared

What about making daily fees equal to you age in years? Most resorts average age is 40+ years and $40-50 seems average for daily rates. $18 for 18 year old, $27 for 27 year old, and $99 for 99 year old.

Andy
Andy

I would charge half price for anyone under 30. If it's too expensive to visit a resort, poor young people will simply find something else to do.

stephen
stephen

I would cap the young rate at 18-30 If the regular fee is $50 (EXAMPLE) the club could have a sliding fee for returning young customers. ( next time you come $40 -$30 for the time after that stopping at $30) the club could also offer a reduced "bring a friend rate" These ideas can be sold to the club as potential for bringing in more business Just my thoughts - I am not a business owner